May 05

electric toothbrush: Oral-B Pro 5000 SmartSeries with Bluetooth Electric Rechargeable Power Toothbrush

Oral-B Pro 5000 SmartSeries with Bluetooth Electric Rechargeable Power Toothbrush

Oral-B Pro 5000 SmartSeries with Bluetooth Electric Rechargeable Power Toothbrush
List Price: $133.19


  • The world’s first toothbrush of its kind with Bluetooth communication between brush and smartphone
  • Real-time feedback with the Oral-B app focuses brushing on your most important areas, tracks habits over time, motivates with helpful oral care tips, and senses when you brush too hard
  • CrossAction round brush head with perfectly angled bristles for a precise clean
  • Clinically proven superior 3D cleaning oscillates, rotates and pulsates to break up and remove up to 100% more plaque than a regular manual toothbrush
  • #1 Dentist Used Toothbrush Brand, Worldwide: Oral-B (data on file)
  • No: 1 Dentist Used Toothbrush Brand, Worldwide – Oral-B (data on file)

Oral-B Pro 5000 SmartSeries with Bluetooth Electric Rechargeable Power Toothbrush
List Price: $133.19
Your Price: $104.99- Oral-B Pro 5000 SmartSeries with Bluetooth Electric Rechargeable Power Toothbrush

The Oral-B PRO 5000 Smartseries rechargeable electric toothbrush with Bluetooth is the world’s first of its kind with Bluetooth connectivity. Bluetooth communication allows the brush to connect with your smartphone to give you real-time feedback on your brushing habits. The professionally inspired design of the CrossAction brush head surrounds each tooth with bristles angled at 16 degrees, and 3D cleaning action oscillates, rotates, and pulsates to break up and remove up to 100% more plaque than a regular manual toothbrush. The pressure sensor lights up if you brush too hard to prevent harmful over-brushing and there are 5 modes and a timer to help you brush for a dentist-recommended 2 minutes. Best of all it’s brought to you by Oral-B – the #1 brand used by dentists worldwide.

Your Price: $104.99 – Oral-B Pro 5000 SmartSeries with Bluetooth Electric Rechargeable Power Toothbrush

Mar 15

More Cerec

HOW TO SEAT YOUR CEREC E.MAX ABUTMENTS
Posted by Sameer Puri (cerecdoctors.com Founder) on March 14th, 2014 at 06:09 am Leave a Comment |
As you know we now have the ability to create custom abutments with the CEREC system. Clinicians are realizing the benefits of the abutments fabricated chair side as they are less expensive than laboratory abutments and relatively easy to fabricate.

With the abutments, we have the ability to fabricate hybrid abutment crowns as well as hybrid abutments. We have well over 40 videos in our digital library section on how to create abutments. You can access the library here:

http://www.cerecdoctors.com/digital-learning/browse/category/12

With regards to creating abutments I’ll give two pieces of advice. The first is that you only want to use the size 14 MO block for creation of the abutments. The size 16 block should only be used for creating the full contour abutment crown. If you use the 16 block for hybrid abutments, you get a massive sprue that you have to spend additional time removing.

The second bit of advice is that you should mark your abutment as well as your TiBase with a marker to help seat your abutment on the TiBase. This will help you orient the abutment properly on the TiBase. Dr. Steve Nielsen posted a great step by step on the complete cementation process that you can access here:

http://www.cerecdoctors.com/discussion-boards/view/id/28195

Utilizing these abutments will absolutely make your CEREC dentistry more profitable and predictable!

HOW TO CHECK MINIMAL THICKNESS UNDER A SPLIT ABUTMENT CROWN USING CEREC
Posted by Darin O’Bryan (Faculty) on March 12th, 2014 at 05:19 am Leave a Comment |
When doing a hybrid abutment the cursor details does not work to let you know what the thickness of your central fissure measures. To check the thickness you have to drag your cursor over every area that you want to check. This is slow and cumbersome. There is a faster method. Once you have the case split and see that there is minimal thickness under the crown, go ahead and change the height of your abutment as desired with the Scale Occlusal Whole Tool.

Then go to the Edit Parameters for the crown. Once you are in the parameter section for the crown, go to the Occlusal Minimal Thickness and change this to your desired thickness.

This will then show you where the crown is thinner than your desired minimal thickness. Then all you have to do is adjust the height of the abutment with the Scale Occlusal Whole Tool until the light blue goes away.

To avoid needing to do this to much it is better to change the Minimal Occlusion Parameter before you split the file. This will give you a better looking abutment proposal. Here is the proposal if the minimal thickness is left at 700 before splitting.

And here it is at 1500 before splitting.

There may be some small amounts of minimal thickness still showing through but the adjustments will be minimal and easily handled by either altering the abutment slightly as I described before or by changing the crown.
CEREC MARKETING
Posted by Mark Fleming (Faculty & Magazine Editor) on March 11th, 2014 at 06:12 am View Comments (1) |
Are you a CEREC owner? Be on the lookout for this letter from Patterson:

The attached document gives more information on the program. Let people know what you can do with this great technology!

Attachments
CEREC_Patient_Marketing_booklet_FINAL_P141254.pdf (944.59 KB)

CEREC TIP – MESO BLOCK RESTORATION TRYIN
Posted by Peter Gardell (Faculty) on March 10th, 2014 at 05:59 am Leave a Comment |
Measure twice – cut once!

Words carpenters live by, because cutting a second piece of wood is the most expensive cut. The same holds for dentistry.

With the new Ivoclar e.max mesoblock, we have a new concern. Since it is bonded to the TiBase, we can’t easily add to the ceramic after it is assembled . You can see a case I went to deliver how this can be a potential problem. After I designed and fabricated the hybrid crown, I went to deliver the restoration. Something appeared to hang up the seating of the crown. Contact seemed a bit tight so it was adjusted, and adjusted until it seemed just right. Unfortunately, when the implant was torqued in, the end result was not what was wanted. Wide open contact, totally unacceptable. Since the crown and TiBase were bonded together, there were three solutions. Do nothing and buy the patient a case of Superfloss, do a large mesial restoration on 18, or remill and redo the implant restoration. Redoing it was the right and proper way to fix my error.

If I had only followed the guidelines from Ivoclar, I could have avoided wasting a precious e.max mesoblock. I would have avoided wasting my time to remake the restoration, avoided wasting the patient’s valuable time to have to return, avoided wasting the valuable chair time required to place a new restoration. Most important, avoided the erosion of the potential profit from this procedure.

The expensive second cut!

The recommended try in process utilizes light body PVS to lute the TiBase to the abutment/hybrid crown. Due to the exact fit of the mesoblock on the TiBAse, anything that sets up harder than light body impression material, such as bite registration material, should be avoided. This could make it more difficult to separate the components after try in. The light body material will keep the components securely together during the try in of your restoration. More importantly, it allows for the restoration assembly to be broken apart easily. It does not contaminate the e.max material so if re-firing is required, you can do so with normal firing cycles.

The process is straight forward and there is a video in the digital learning section of cerecdoctors showing how I did it with this case. It is http://www.cerecdoctors.com/digital-learning/view/id/1199

Try in before bonding – a wise move!
MATCHING SHADES WITH CEREC BLOCKS
Posted by Rich Rosenblatt (Faculty) on March 7th, 2014 at 08:04 am Leave a Comment |
Do you have trouble matching those difficult C and D shade cases? They can be very tough. We have some great blocks out there like Vita’s Real Life block and the Sirona C In block that have a dentin shaded core and then more translucent enamel to help with this, but not everyone has these blocks in stock. What can one do in a case when you do not have those blocks? Here is a trick I have done for years and it really seems to work well in my hands. I generally do this on teeth in the esthetic zone and it can only be done with the multi shaded blocks like Vita Triluxe, Empress Multi or the Sirona PC blocks. Here is the workflow:

This case was a premolar tooth on a patient with C2 shade. I did not have any C2 blocks, but my Easyshade from Vita told me that I could use a 2M2 shade also. This was the block in the milling preview initially with the Triluxe option selected.

Notice that the block was probably a size 12 selected and the sprue is on the lingual. This will need to be changed.

The first thing I do is check the size of the block. I like to change the block size to the largest option to I can have the most maneuverability of my restoration within that block, so I change it to a 14/14.

The next step that must be done it to move the sprue to the interproximal. I know that many don’t like to have to remove the sprue, but 1) it is not hard to do and 2) it is the only way to allow the next step I will show to happen.

I will then activate the move tool and I will rotate the block 90 degrees so that the translucent zone is now on the facial. I can manipulate the translucent area so there is a bit of the middle layer at the gingival 1/3 and I can still get a multi layer effect. The advantage of rotating the block like this is that the darker dentin from the C or D shaded dentin will much more readily shine through the translucent portion of the block and we’ll get a very nice match. You may need to do a bit of characterization to dial in the final touches, but this really works great and makes a difficult task of ours a bit easier.
A TIP DOING IMPLANT QUADRANTS WITH CEREC
Posted by Mike Skramstad (Faculty) on March 6th, 2014 at 06:12 am Leave a Comment |
When setting the restoration axis for two adjacent implants, make sure you use link options to “group” them together. This will make both of your restorations parallel off the TiBase and greatly minimize proximal contact adjustments when you set them.

This is a case I did in which I had no adjustments at all:

Tooth #3 and #4 with slightly different axis (these are the Scanpost)

When setting the restoration axis, I grouped them together to make the restorations parallel.

Final results.
CEREC MILLED PROVISIONALS
Posted by Bob Conte on March 5th, 2014 at 05:23 am View Comments (2) |
A patient walks into your office having lost an old 4 unit PFM bridge. It happens. What to do? In the days B.C. (Before CEREC) our course of treatment may look like this.

– Take a preliminary alginate for provisional bridge fabrication
– Pour alginate in a fast setting stone to create model
– Anesthetize and refine preparations
– Retract tissue
– Trim model. Try to locate a few denture teeth to serve as pontics and assemble them within the model.
– Fabricate a vacuum formed shell for the provisional. Trim the template.
– Take final impressions for your bridge with pvs and wait for the material to set
– Take opposing alginate and Blue Mousse bite registration
– Fill the provisional template with Luxatemp or similar, seat in the mouth and wait for material to set
– Now spend 10-15 minutes creating a dust storm in your lab as you trim the acrylic bridge to obtain proper contours and contacts.
– Polish and cement temp.
Now what was the most difficult part of this whole process? Making the provisional bridge. Think about the steps that go into the process. It takes a lot of effort to create a well-fitted and esthetic provisional that will last for the length of time needed until the final bridge is completed.

Let’s look at the same scenario in a CEREC office.

– Anesthesize and refine preparations
– Retract tissue (perhaps)
– Scan both arches and the buccal bite in Sirona Connect
– Save and move the case to Chairside 4.2 software.
– Design the bridge digitally
– Mill the bridge out of Vita CAD Temp or Telio Cad
– With just about zero adjustments polish/glaze and cement the bridge
– Send case to your favorite Sirona Connect laboratory for a zirconium reinforced bridge.
The milling time for a 4 unit bridge is approximately 40 minutes. If you look at all of the steps needed in the first scenario, you’d be hard pressed to beat the amount of time and energy needed to create the provisional. The result is a beautiful, well-fitted and durable provisional. All you had to do was push the start button!

Mill those temps!

MANAGING MULTIPLE ANTERIORS: PART 4 BREAKING UP THE DESIGN
Posted by Darin O’Bryan (Faculty) on March 4th, 2014 at 05:38 am Leave a Comment |
The longest part of doing multiple anterior teeth is the milling process. If you design all the teeth at once and then mill them you have 6-10 minutes a tooth if fast milled. The problem with fast milling on most anterior cases it the margin design will be prone to chip so you have to regular mill the restorations. So now the 6-10 minutes goes to 8-12+ minutes. To make it easier to accomplish a multi unit anterior case in one visit the preparation time needs to be leveraged by the milling time. To do this I prepare one tooth then send it to the milling chamber. I scan the provisional in Biocopy for the central incisor then remove it and finalize the preparation.

Once I cut off the area of the provisional, I polish the interproximals of the adjacent ares to give a good smooth contact that will be imaged when I do the adjacent tooth.

This helps develop proper embrasures during design. Now for the design process, you can use either Biocopy or Bioindividual. You will still use the Biocopy folder that you put the provisional in even if you do Bioindividual. The Biocopy gives you a good reference point when determining the midline and the incisal edge position. Once you have the design done and the crown sent to the milling chamber, open a new CEREC program and image the other central incisor temporary the same way but make sure to capture the interproximal areas. This area is then either copied if doing Biocopy or used to determine where the proximal contact needs to be on the newly designed crown.
SHARING CEREC KNOWLEDGE
Posted by Rich Rosenblatt (Faculty) on March 3rd, 2014 at 05:16 am Leave a Comment |
The power of knowledge from your peers is such an amazing thing. A few weeks ago, a new user was posting on the boards about some difficulty they were having figuring out a problem with their new machine. The problem was that on his post op x-rays, he was seeing what he felt was an open margin. He was feeling frustrated and came to the cerecdoctors.com message boards to hopefully get some answers. What followed on that thread was one of the best learning threads I have seen in a long time, lead by numerous dentists. Some were faculty, some were mentors and other just rabid users of the site and of the technology. They helped this doctor break down his process from imaging, to design to cementation technique. Were there critiques…sure there were. Did the entire thread remain incredibly positive and supportive…you better believe it.

We were all new users who struggled at points during our learning curve. The majority tend to come out much better dentists because of it. I am so proud of the people who participate regularly on the cerecdoctors.com message boards. They offer advice because they are probably paying it forward for help that they were given along the way by others on the journey. I find CEREC users, and the folks who frequent the message boards to be some of the kindest, most knowledgeable people I have ever come across in the dental industry and possibly in life. Some of my best friendships have been formed from the people I have met there.

Getting back to this thread, it turns out that it was not a cement thing but a prep thing mainly. Some great advice was given by many, and one of our magnificent mentors (Dr. Marc Thomas) gave a great visual tutorial. Low and behold, the new user posted an x-ray of his next CEREC seat. This one looked just text book!

This blog is a shout out to an amazing community of people. If you are having issues and not on the message boards asking questions as to why, you are truly missing out. Some of the best people that you will ever cross paths with are there and waiting to pay it forward. Stop on by and see what I mean. Also, I want to thank Dr. Oscar Vega, who I asked permission to share this thread and he responded with this “Please feel free to use all my images for a blog post. I joined the website for this exact reason and I hope my learning process can help others. All the input from everyone has helped me troubleshoot each step of my CEREC protocol and I think I finally honed into what I’ve been doing wrong.”

Check out this thread for starters to see how it inspired me to write this blog: http://www.cerecdoctors.com/discussion-boards/view/id/27586/page/1
POINTER ON MILLING E.MAX ABUTMENT BLOCK
Posted by Mike Skramstad (Faculty) on February 28th, 2014 at 07:05 am Leave a Comment |
When you mill a hybrid abutment crown out of the A16 e.max Abutment Block (one piece screw retained), it will undergo a step mill process all the way into the metal mandrel. This process will take upwards of 15 min and it will look like this as it’s doing it:

After this step is completed, the burs will undergo another touch process. Sometimes little “flecks” of porcelain will get on the metal mandrel in the point where the burs are doing the touch process. This will error out your mill process and tell you that something when wrong (bur error, etc…). This is not the case usually. Just open the chamber and clean off the flecks of porcelain with your fingers and then continue. The milling process should finish fine.

Here is a final mill of two hybrid abutment crowns. Notice the step mill into the mandrel:

– See more at: http://www.cerecdoctors.com/blog#sthash.QzmVfbEK.dpuf

Mar 15

Cerec Doctor’s implant

Mar 15

Cerec crowns

CEREC 3D. Joz's tooth 19

CEREC 3D.

SHARING CEREC KNOWLEDGE

Posted by Rich Rosenblatt (Faculty) on March 3rd, 2014 at 05:16 am
Comments (0) |
The power of knowledge from your peers is such an amazing thing. A few weeks ago, a new user was posting on the boards about some difficulty they were having figuring out a problem with their new machine. The problem was that on his post op x-rays, he was seeing what he felt was an open margin. He was feeling frustrated and came to the cerecdoctors.com message boards to hopefully get some answers. What followed on that thread was one of the best learning threads I have seen in a long time, lead by numerous dentists. Some were faculty, some were mentors and other just rabid users of the site and of the technology. They helped this doctor break down his process from imaging, to design to cementation technique. Were there critiques…sure there were. Did the entire thread remain incredibly positive and supportive…you better believe it.

We were all new users who struggled at points during our learning curve. The majority tend to come out much better dentists because of it. I am so proud of the people who participate regularly on the cerecdoctors.com message boards. They offer advice because they are probably paying it forward for help that they were given along the way by others on the journey. I find CEREC users, and the folks who frequent the message boards to be some of the kindest, most knowledgeable people I have ever come across in the dental industry and possibly in life. Some of my best friendships have been formed from the people I have met there.

Be connected par Eric Berger 9

Be connected to sironaconnect.com and Ceramic Art 52742

Getting back to this thread, it turns out that it was not a cement thing but a prep thing mainly. Some great advice was given by many, and one of our magnificent mentors (Dr. Marc Thomas) gave a great visual tutorial. Low and behold, the new user posted an x-ray of his next CEREC seat. This one looked just text book!

This blog is a shout out to an amazing community of people. If you are having issues and not on the message boards asking questions as to why, you are truly missing out. Some of the best people that you will ever cross paths with are there and waiting to pay it forward. Stop on by and see what I mean. Also, I want to thank Dr. Oscar Vega, who I asked permission to share this thread and he responded with this “Please feel free to use all my images for a blog post. I joined the website for this exact reason and I hope my learning process can help others. All the input from everyone has helped me troubleshoot each step of my CEREC protocol and I think I finally honed into what I’ve been doing wrong.”

CEREC-krona

CEREC Wikipedia

Check out this thread for starters to see how it inspired me to write this blog: http://www.cerecdoctors.com/discussion-boards/view/id/27586/page/1

embedded image

embedded image
– See more at: http://www.cerecdoctors.com/blog/view/id/764/sharing-cerec-knowledge#sthash.HNNufD0J.dpuf

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Mar 15

Video: Implant

Oct 30

[WATCH]: How to Floss Teeth : Effective Teeth Flossing Tips

Rating: 4

Flossing your teeth effectively is important for keeping healthy teeth and gums. Learn some tips on how to floss effectively with tips from a dental hygienists in this free oral hygiene video. Expert: Evelyn Perreault, RDH Contact: www.toothpixstore.com Bio: Evelyn Perreault, a registered dental hygienist, has over 25 years of clinical and educational experience in the oral care industry. Filmmaker: David Pakman

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Oct 30

dental: N E W – Rapid Dental Remedies

N E W – Rapid Dental Remedies

The Brand New Rapid Dental Remedies.
N E W - Rapid Dental Remedies

Oct 30

Dental care Implants: A brand new development within the field of dentistry

Speaking from the surgical treatment, it may be carried out to get rid of tooth that are not really responsive to become removed. This particular occurs if you find not really adequate keeping bottom with regard to tugging tooth away. This really is usually the situation once the the teeth tend to be considerably broken as well as divided departing inadequate room with regard to grasping tooth. Surgical treatment may also end up being required for knowledge the teeth elimination. Usually, these types of the teeth don’t function high of eating perform and therefore are simply occupant from the mouth room. Frequently, they are discovered to develop wrongly within non-straight method. Occasionally these types of may not obtain elevated upward correctly in the chewing gum resulting in the actual chewing gum since the the teeth. This may be an extremely unpleasant scenario for any individual. Additionally, these types of take up the area from the mouth departing away small with regard to additional the teeth. Therefore, physicians recommend with regard to knowledge the teeth elimination.


By Anonymous

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Oct 30

electric toothbrush: Oral-B Professional Healthy Clean Precision 1000 Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush 1 Count

Oral-B Professional Healthy Clean Precision 1000 Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush 1 Count

Oral-B Professional Healthy Clean Precision 1000 Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush 1 Count

List Price: $74.88


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  • Dentist-inspired Precision Cleanâ?¢ refill brush head surrounds each tooth for precise cleaning in hard to reach areas.
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Oral-B Professional Healthy Clean Precision 1000 Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush 1 Count

List Price: $74.88

Your Price: $55.00- Oral-B Professional Healthy Clean Precision 1000 Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush 1 Count

Experience the power of Oral-B® with Oral-B® Professional™ Healthy Clean™ ! Provides up to 5x better plaque removal at the gumline.* Features include Precision Clean™ refill brush head with Indicator™ bristles which fade half-way to indicate when to replace brush head for better cleaning, waterproof ergonomic handle, professional timer, 1 cleaning modes (Daily Clean), in handle display with charge level display, and portable charging station. Pack contents included are 1 handle, 1 charger, and 1 Precision Clean™ refill brush head. *vs. a regular manual toothbrush.

Your Price: $55.00 – Oral-B Professional Healthy Clean Precision 1000 Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush 1 Count

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Oct 30

[WATCH]: How To Floss Your Teeth

Rating: 4

Watch more Teeth & Oral Care videos: www.howcast.com Subscribe to Howcast’s YouTube Channel – howc.st Don’t just stand there — get flossing! Howcast uploads the highest quality how-to videos daily! Be sure to check out our playlists for guides that interest you: howc.st Subscribe to Howcast’s other YouTube Channels: Howcast Health Channel – howc.st Howcast Video Games Channel – howc.st Howcast Tech Channel – howc.st Howcast Food Channel – howc.st Howcast Arts & Recreation Channel – howc.st Howcast Sports & Fitness Channel – howc.st Howcast Personal Care & Style Channel – howc.st Howcast empowers people with engaging, useful how-to information wherever, whenever they need to know how. Emphasizing high-quality instructional videos, Howcast brings you experts who provide accurate information in easy-to-follow tutorials on everything from makeup, hairstyling, nail art design, and soccer to parkour, skateboarding, dancing, kissing, and much, much more. Step 1: Choose floss Choose your floss. Waxed floss slides between the teeth easier than unwaxed floss. Tip If you have wide gaps between your teeth, try using tape floss, which is thicker than regular floss. Step 2: Break off & wrap Break off about 18 inches of the floss and wrap most of it around your index fingers, leaving about 4 inches between your hands. Step 3: Move back & forth Looking in your mirror to see what you’re doing, move the floss gently back and forth, guiding it between two teeth. Step 4: Clean gum line

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